Tag Archives: slaves

Colonizers imported slaves to this African country as locals reigned supreme


Slavery in South Africa started in 1652, just around the same time as colonization.

This was when Jan van Riebeeck, the representative of the Dutch East India Company (the VOC), arrived in Cape Town to set up a refreshment station, where ships can resupply before sailing into India.

Van Riebeeck’s arrival was, however, not what one could call the coming of the white man in South Africa as colonialism is often associated with.

There were already white European and Asian people living in South Africa following several shipwrecks, which occurred along the coast.

Many of them joined the local people, that is Xhosa communities and the Khoi, lived with them permanently and even married them leading to so many clans.

Statue of Jan van Riebeeck — Pinterest

Riebeeck, after setting…

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Fair Park's New Exhibit Asks How Thomas Jefferson Could Own Slaves



Dallas will soon get a first look at an expanded exhibit of relics that shed light on the life of Sally Hemings, Thomas Jefferson's enslaved concubine.
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Juneteenth celebration in Hannibal celebrates slaves’ emancipation


Posted: Jun. 19, 2018 12:01 am Updated: Jun. 19, 2018 11:55 pm

HANNIBAL, Mo. — It was standing room only at Hannibal’s 21st annual Juneteenth celebration Tuesday at the Hannibal Free Public Library.

During the 45-minute presentation, St. Louis storyteller and musician Wendy Gordon traced the history of the Negro spiritual. She sang about 10 songs that spanned music from the time of slavery, to the civil rights movement to music from today. Such songs included “Amazing Grace,” “Take the ‘A’ Train,” “Hold On Just a Little Bit Longer” and “Lift Every Voice and Sing.”

“We’re taking a musical journey back in time,” Gordon said. “Many of these songs have meaning and will show how these sacred traditions influenced our (African-American) community.”

Former…

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Brooklyn residents honor freedom of slaves in America


EAST NEW YORK -

Brooklyn residents flocked to the Festival of Juneteenth, which honors the end of slavery in the United States.

The event, which has been celebrated in East New York for the past nine years, featured singing, dancing and a marching band. All of the ambience was to celebrate what is known as Freedom Day; the day that slaves were freed in June 1865.

Athenia Rodney has organized the event for the past nine years and says this is the biggest turnout the event has ever had. The event was inspired by her grandmother who say says grew up in the south working low-wage jobs like cotton-picking.

Rodney says the festival shows how far the African-American community has come and also serves as an education for newer generations.

The theme for this year’s festival was unity.

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How freed African slaves in London in the 1700s helped abolish slave trade


In the late 18th century, London was developing amidst wealth from the boom in the trans-Atlantic Slave trade, the greatest crime against humanity that Britain was heavily involved in.

Major institutions in London, from the banks to museums, made huge profits from the slave trade which dated back to the 16th century.

But at the same time, there was also a rise in the number of abolition organisations that demanded an end to the slave trade.

This is in spite of the fierce opposition they faced from those who were making great sums of money from the trade.

Apart from the Quakers, one of the abolitionist groups that made significant progress in the fight against the slave trade was Sons of Africa.

This group was made up of Africans who had been freed from slavery and were living in London, with…

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Slaves to Soldiers Honored – The Tennessee Tribune


Nearly 24,000 men served in the US Colored Troops, many conscripted in 1862-63 to build Fort Negley in Nashville and Fort Granger in Franklin. Photo from SlavesToSoldiers.com

FRANKLIN, TN — Williamson County African American veterans of the Civil War were honored on Memorial Day at Veterans Park by the African American Heritage Society of Williamson County.

Brick pavers with veterans’ names were dedicated at Five Points in the park operated by county veterans service officers, according to Heritage Society Board Member Tina Jones who started the program; Slaves to Soldiers.

“Until recently, it was thought that only a handful of former slaves from Williamson County had joined the Union forces to fight during the Civil War,” she said. Additional research revealed it’s…

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