Tag Archives: Struggles

Film explores struggles of black Catholics


“Facing an Uncomfortable Truth,” a new documentary by Steve Crump, above, examines the contributions made by Kentucky’s early African American Catholics. (Photo Special to The Record)

By Jessica Able, Record Staff Writer

African American Catholics helped build some of the oldest churches in the Archdiocese of Louisville, yet oftentimes they were relegated to the back pews of parishes and could not receive Communion at the main altar.

A new documentary “Facing an Uncomfortable Truth”  explores contributions made by Kentucky’s early African American Catholics as far back as the 18th century. Its producer, Steve Crump, is a son of the Archdiocese of Louisville and a descendant of those early black Catholics.

“They were builders and caretakers,…

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Through books, a teacher helps a student confront personal struggles


ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — Michelle Kuo’s book “Reading With Patrick – A Teacher, A Student and a Life-Changing Friendship” is an insightful, unblinking yet affecting memoir. At its heart, it’s about the enduring friendship between Kuo, a 22-year-old Asian-American English teacher right out of Harvard, and Patrick, an African-American eighth-grader, in the Mississippi River town of Helena, Ark.

The memoir also operates on many larger stages.

It shows the power of literacy and how African-American writers can be a tool to promote reading and the development of one’s imagination. Kuo exposes the…

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While Old Struggles Continue, the New Fight for Justice is in the Digital Arena – The Charleston Chronicle


By Hazel Trice Edney

(TriceEdneyWire.com) – Amidst this historic year of 2018 – marked by 50th anniversaries and landmarks of the civil rights movement – one thing remains clear:

“While a lot has changed for African Americans and other people of color in this country since 1968, many things have not. Even after the historic two-term election of the first African-American president of the United States, full racial equality remains a distant goal.”

Secondly, “Progress toward this goal must currently be pursued under the national leadership of a president whose rhetoric and actions have done more to fan the flames of racism and divisiveness rather than inspire greater equality.”

Dr. Valerie Rawlston, director, Economic Policy Institute’s Program on Race,…

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Despite struggles, African superiors plan for future of vibrant religious life


More than 400 brightly habited women and men religious from some of the most troubled areas of Africa gathered in Yaoundé, Cameroon, in January to reflect on their roles in the future of their countries and the continent.

The symposium, “Consecrated Person: Identity, Prophecy and Mission,” had a special guest. Cardinal João Braz de Aviz, prefect of the Congregation for Institutes of Consecrated Life and Societies of Apostolic Life, represented the Vatican and remained for the symposium and the assembly of the Confederation of Major Superiors of Africa and Madagascar (COMSAM) that followed.

The keynote speaker of the second day of the symposium focused on celibate chastity as an apostolic, prophetic and missionary commitment. One might think such a vow is only personal, but in fact, it…

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50 years after King’s death, struggles remain for African Americans in Memphis


“Here we are 50 years later, and not much has improved,” said Bobby Rogers, a 39-year-old electrician from South Los Angeles, who stood in the motel’s former parking lot one day this week with delegates from his local union, gazing up at the balcony where King was shot on April 4, 1968.

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Atlanta Struggles To Meet MLK’s Legacy On Health Care


ATLANTA — While public safety commissioner Bull Connor’s police dogs in 1963 attacked civil rights protesters in Birmingham, Ala., leaders in Martin Luther King Jr.’s hometown of Atlanta were burnishing its reputation as “the city too busy to hate.”

Yet 50 years after the civil rights leader was killed, some public health leaders here wonder whether the city is failing to live up to King’s call for justice in health care. They point to substantial disparities, particularly in preventive care.

“We have world-class health care facilities in Atlanta, but the challenge is that we’re still seeing worse outcomes” for African-Americans, said Kathryn Lawler, executive director of the Atlanta Regional Collaborative for Health Improvement. That group includes representatives of more…

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