Tag Archives: statin

African-Americans less likely to get recommended statin therapy


(HealthDay)—African-Americans are less likely than whites to be treated with statins or to receive a statin at guideline-recommended intensity, according to a study published online June 13 in JAMA Cardiology.

Michael G. Nanna, M.D., from the Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N.C., and colleagues examined differences in statin use between white and African-American patients using the 2015 Patient and Provider Assessment of Lipid Management (PALM) Registry.

Overall, 5,689 patients in the PALM Registry were eligible to receive statin therapy. The…

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Blacks Still Show Lower Statin Treatment Rates than Whites


Use of statins among African Americans in 2015 was lower than among whites, researchers said, suggesting that different perceptions about cardiovascular risk and the drugs’ safety and efficacy could be part of the reason.

The treatment rate among African Americans for whom statins would nominally be indicated was 70.6%, versus 74.8% among whites (P=0.02), according to data from the nationwide Patient and Provider Assessment of Lipid Management (PALM) registry, reported Michael Nanna, MD, of Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, and colleagues, in JAMA Cardiology.

“The reasons underlying racial differences in satin therapy are complex, with African American patients differing from white…

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Among African Americans in Need of LDL Lowering: Less Statin Use, More Distrust of Doctors


Demographics and socioeconomic differences explain some, but not all, of the differences in statin use.

Not only are African American individuals who are eligible for statin therapy less likely to receive the LDL-lowering therapy than their white counterparts, but they are less likely to receive a statin at the guideline-recommended intensity when they are treated, according to a new analysis.

The reason for the discrepancy in management, say investigators, stems not only from demographic and socioeconomic differences between the two groups, but also from different beliefs and perceptions about statin therapy.

“While the differences in statin treatment were partially explained by demographic and clinical factors, other factors likely contributed,” lead investigator Michael Nanna, MD…

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WENY News – Statin recommendations may change, especially for African-Americ


By Jen Christensen CNN

(CNN) — Dr. Sanjay Basu was treating an African-American man whom he intuitively thought would be at a high risk for a stroke. The patient smoked; he was older and had high cholesterol. But when the doctor of internal medicine and assistant professor of medicine at Stanford University put these details into an application that calculates a person’s risk based on current guidelines, it didn’t agree with him.

“It gave me a really bizarre answer and showed that he was really below risk, and that didn’t make sense to me at all,” Basu said. “The patient joked with me and said, ‘See, I’m fine. I finally caught you.’ He thought he got one over on me.”

The calculator, which is maintained by the American College of Cardiology, is supposed to estimate a patient’s 10-year risk of…

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*** This news item is 3rd party content and is included strictly for non-commercial informational purposes.

Statin recommendations may change, especially for African-Americans



Dr. Sanjay Basu was treating an African-American man whom he intuitively thought would be at a high risk for a stroke. The patient smoked; he was …
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*** This news item is 3rd party content and is included strictly for non-commercial informational purposes.

New calculator could change aspirin, statin, and blood pressure prescribing


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ore than 11 million people may need to reconsider taking medications to avoid heart attack and stroke, according to new research that says current guidelines overestimate risk for some people, but underestimate risk for others, especially African-Americans.

Right now, doctors can consult a calculator found online or in electronic health records to decide whether patients might benefit from aspirin, statins, or blood pressure medications. Those estimates of 10-year risk for cardiovascular disease were derived in 2013 and endorsed by the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association. They were based on statistical analyses that combined data from large studies such as the original Framingham Heart Study, whose participants were 30 to 62 years old in 1948.

A team from…

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*** This news item is 3rd party content and is included strictly for non-commercial informational purposes.