Tag Archives: segregation

“The Color of Law” Definitively Proves that Government PROMOTED Segregation in America for Generations


Most of us look around our neighborhoods, towns, cities, counties and probably think it’s totally “natural” (e.g., things just evolved that way because of individual preferences, geographical features, proximity to major economic centers, whatever – but certainly nothing insidious, let alone racist, about it) that things would be the way they are. For instance, I bet that most people barely give a second thought, at least not consciously, to the mix of people who live in their community, the most common modes of transportation, the size of lots, how clean/dirty it is, how urban/suburban/rural it is, the most prevalent types/sizes of housing, the mix of owners vs. renters, you name it.

Of course, the reality is that almost none of this just sprung up “naturally.” To the…

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George N. Leighton, Lawyer Who Fought Segregation, Dies at 105


CHICAGO — George N. Leighton, a distinguished Chicago lawyer and judge who worked to desegregate juries and schools, advocated for people facing the death penalty and represented a Chicago crime boss, died on June 6 in Brockton, Mass. He was 105.

His death, at a veterans hospital, was confirmed by Langdon Neal, the executor of Mr. Leighton’s estate. He had returned to Massachusetts, his home state, after retiring.

When Mr. Leighton moved to Chicago in the 1940s, he and other African-Americans could not join local bar associations or rent space at most downtown office buildings. But by the end of his six-decade career he was one of the most accomplished lawyers in the city’s history.

That career included stints as a lawyer in private practice, as an assistant state attorney general and as a…

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For Black Women With Breast Cancer, Segregation And Other Factors Linked To Worse Outcomes


A new review finds that lower rates of survival for African-American women with breast cancer are linked to segregation, poverty and lack of access to healthcare facilities.  

Thousands of studies on breast cancer have looked at how a person’s race can affect both when they get diagnosed and their chance of survival. But only a few have explored how racial disparities are connected to other factors, like where women live.

“If you’re living in poor neighborhood conditions, it’s going to have a negative effect on your outcomes” or the stage at which you get diagnosed, said University of Illinois doctoral student Brandi Patrice Smith.

Smith is the lead author of a new review, published in the journal Hormones and Cancer, that aggregates the…

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‘Color Of Law’ Author On The Government’s Role In Segregation, Redlining


Redlining is the act of segregating neighborhoods along racial lines. And it’s the subject of a new book by former New York Times columnist Richard Rothstein.

Rothstein’s book, “The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America” outlines the ways the government and institutions actively participated in this segregation. Rothstein will be in Louisville Thursday. I spoke with him about how redlining began. Listen in the player above.

On how limiting where someone can live effects all aspects of their life:

“The fact that African-Americans could not get loans for homes in neighborhoods that were predominately African-American forced them to pay much more for housing than whites would have to pay for similar housing. It increased their poverty, it…

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Dovey Johnson Roundtree: Lawyer who blazed a trail for African-Americans and women during segregation


Dovey Johnson Roundtree, who has died aged 104, was a criminal defence lawyer and courtroom warrior for civil rights who played a critical early role in the desegregation of interstate bus travel in the US. She also mentored generations of black lawyers.

In a career that spanned nearly half a century, Roundtree defended predominantly poor African-American clients – as well as black churches, community groups and the occasional politician.

Her best-known case involved Raymond Crump Jr, the black labourer accused in the 1964 killing of socialite and painter Mary Pinchot Meyer, a white woman. He was acquitted despite what initially appeared to be damning witness testimony, though the Meyer case remains unsolved.

“I think in the black community there was a feeling that even if…

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A bridge to segregation? An Englewood photographer introduces neighbors on opposite sides of Chicago


The street names around her high school in Lakeview sounded familiar to Tonika Johnson but everything else made her feel like it was a world apart from her Englewood neighborhood.

As she commuted by train and bus to Lane Technical College Prep High School, she’d pass Paulina Street and Ashland Avenue, north-south streets that stretch to her South Side neighborhood. The route near school was dotted with occupied homes, shops, green patches of grass and flowers. But as Johnson neared home each day, she saw vacant lots, empty storefronts and a lack of greenery that made her question: How could these neighborhoods, just 10 miles apart, look so different?

That feeling of living in a divided city followed Johnson, now 38, as she started working on an upcoming multimedia…

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