Tag Archives: Plaques

New plaques celebrate African-American Heritage Trail – News – Columbia Daily Tribune


Barbra Horrell never got to sink her teeth into one of Annie Fisher’s famous beaten biscuits, but she imagines they must have been “mighty good.”

Horrell’s high school math teacher, Ms. Turner, would invite her students over for Christmas Day to try her best imitation of Fisher’s mouth-watering creation. They were tasty, Horrell said, but nobody could make them like Annie.

The Sharp End Heritage Committee unveiled two plaques commemorating local black history today — one at the site of the Douglass Pool and the original Russell Chapel on Providence Avenue, and another at the site of Fisher’s home on Park Avenue.

The pool and park were constructed in 1938 and served Columbia’s black community while segregationist policies prohibited blacks from enjoying other public…

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College unveils plaques April 19 honoring first women, African-American students in residence


In a ceremony April 19, the College of William and Mary unveiled two new plaques on the Sir Christopher Wren Building piazza. COURTESY PHOTO / WM.EDU

Just days before College of William and Mary President Taylor Reveley read an official apology on behalf of the Board of Visitors for the College’s role in slavery and segregation, he unveiled two new plaques on the Sir Christopher Wren Building’s piazza. One plaque commemorates the College’s 24 first female students, the other commemorates Lynn Briley ’71, Karen Ely ’71 and Janet Brown Strafer ’71, M.Ed. ’77, the College’s first three African-American students in residence.

In a ceremony Thursday, April 19, Briley, Ely and Strafer — known as the Legacy 3 — and the descendants of the first 24 female students walked through…

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William and Mary dedicate 50th and 100th anniversary plaques


Plaques honoring the 50th anniversary of the first African-American female undergraduates and the 100th anniversary of coeducation at the college were dedicated Thursday at the Wren Building at the College of William and Mary.

The 50th-anniversary plaque honors the Legacy Three, who enrolled as the first African-American students in residence at the college. The 100th anniversary is for the first 24 women who enrolled as students in September 1918, making William and Mary the first coeducational public university in Virginia.

Money was the reason both of these changes happened. Women were allowed into William and Mary because WWI had taken away so man student from the campus the college was at risk of closing. However, not everyone supported the integration. An

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College to unveil plaques honoring first women, African-American residential students April 19


Where the plaques on the Sir Christopher Wren Building’s piazza has been marked. The plaques will be unveiled April 19. COURTESY PHOTO / WM.EDU

The Sir Christopher Wren Building piazza is adorned with plaques commemorating notable College of William and Mary firsts, from the first law school to the first honor code. At a public ceremony April 19, the College will unveil two new plaques honoring the university’s first female and African-American residential students.

One of these tablets will include the names of the College’s first three African-American residential students: Lynn Briley ’71, Karen Ely ’71 and Janet Brown Strafer ’71, M.Ed. ’77. These three women have been honored throughout the 2017-18 academic year and will be honored once more during May’s Commencement…

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Plaques at Ole Miss acknowledge its historic ties to slavery


JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — The University of Mississippi is acknowledging its historical connections to slave labor, slave owners and officials who set policies that stripped African-Americans of voting rights after the Civil War.

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The university on Friday unveiled six plaques on its main campus in Oxford to provide information about the history of the school that was founded in 1848.

“These…

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