Tag Archives: disease

Heart Disease Still Deadly for African-American Women |


Leading members of the medical community, representing the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute or the Association of Black Cardiologists, along with two women of color — both survivors of various manifestations of heart disease — engaged with editors and publishers from across the U.S., respected members of the Black or Hispanic media, during an informative afternoon session of vital importance to their readers, “Healthy Hearts in Every Community: Partnering with Media to Advance Prevention, Treatment and Research,” held earlier this year at the Harvard Club of New York City. (D. Kevin McNeir/The Washington Informer)

The future remains uncertain for the Affordable Care Act (ACA) which opened the door for a major overhaul of the U.S. health care system with President Barack Obama’s…

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PSA aimed at African Americans highlights kidney disease and organ donation


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The Big Ask: The Big Give, Tracy McKibben & Dr. Velma Scantlebury-White, MD

April is National Donate Life Month and National Minority Health Month and the New York-based National Kidney Foundation recently released a public-service announcement targeted to African- Americans to foster awareness of kidney disease and organ donation.

The 60-second PSA features two prominent African-American women involved in fighting kidney disease: Kidney transplant surgeon, Velma Scantlebury-White, M.D., America’s first African-American, female, transplant surgeon, and New York business executive Tracy McKibben, who donated a kidney to her mother. There is also a four-minute video featuring McKibben and Scantlebury-White.

“One of the things we battle with is getting…

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Nasopharyngeal Microbiome and Respiratory Disease in African Children



This project is under the H3Africa Initiative which aims to facilitate a contemporary research approach to the study of genomics and environmental determinants of common diseases with the goal of improving the health of African populations. To accomplish this, the H3Africa Initiative assists in the …
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Less heart disease, stroke in immigrants than in U.S.-born | News


By Anne Harding

(Reuters Health) – People living in the U.S. but born elsewhere may have lower risk for heart disease and stroke than their native-born neighbors, suggests a new study.

Foreign-born residents had a range of risks, however. Women from Europe and men from Africa or South America had the lowest stroke rates compared to U.S.-born peers. Heart disease rates were lowest among men and women from Asia, the Caribbean, Central America and Mexico and highest among men from the Indian Subcontinent and Europe.

Heart disease is the top cause of death in the U.S., and stroke is the fifth-leading cause, the study team points out in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

Past research has suggested that U.S. residents…

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African Americans and Kidney Disease during National Minority Health Month


For many, spring marks a fresh start. Yet for others, as April – National Donate Life Month and National Minority Health Month – begins, it’s a reminder of the staggering reality and ratio that African Americans are at least three times more likely than Whites to develop end-stage renal disease, most commonly known as kidney failure. This lingering health crisis, its urgency, and the need to solve the problem through living kidney donations versus years of dialysis, are the focal points of a new 60-second video public service announcement produced by the National Kidney Foundation (NKF) as part of THE BIG ASK: THE BIG GIVE platform.

The PSA features two prominent African American women dedicated to fighting kidney disease: Kidney transplant surgeon Velma Scantlebury-White, MD,…

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African Americans Face Higher Risk of Kidney Disease, Report Says |


African Americans constitute more than 35 percent of all patients in the U.S. receiving dialysis for kidney failure. (Courtesy of Baltimore.gov)

The National Kidney Foundation has found that because of high rates of diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease, African Americans have an increased risk of developing kidney failure.

Foundation officials said African Americans need to be aware of these risk factors and visit their doctor or clinic regularly to check their blood sugar, blood pressure, urine protein and kidney function.

Tests reveal that African Americans suffer from kidney failure at a significantly higher rate than whites — more than 3 times higher. African Americans constitute more than 35 percent of all patients in the U.S. receiving dialysis for kidney failure, but only…

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