Tag Archives: disease

NIH, Prostate Cancer Foundation Partner to Study Disease Aggressiveness in African Americans



"Understanding why African-American men are more likely to be diagnosed with aggressive prostate cancer than men of other racial and ethnic …
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Antigua: Drones could help fight disease


(ANTIGUA OBSERVER) – The Caribbean Agricultural Research and Development Institute (CARDI) representative in Antigua and Barbuda, Paul Lucas, has offered advice to mitigate the spread and effects of the lethal yellowing disease afflicting coconut trees.

In an interview on OBSERVER AM yesterday, Lucas discussed how CARDI and International Trade Centre (ITC) will be teaming up to develop the coconut industry across the Caribbean.

“For the larger trees it would be difficult to go up and spray for mites and such. We have proposed the use of technology like drones. There are parts of the world where they are used to spray. It reduces the risk of persons involved in the industry. It might not be safe to climb these trees in bad weather. We are looking at more holistic ways to reduce risk,”…

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Progression of chronic kidney disease in African American with type 2 diabetes mellitus using topology learning in …


Abstract

Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a common, complex, and heterogeneous disease impacting aging populations. Determining the landscape of disease progression trajectories from midlife to senior age in a “real-world” context allows us to better understand the progression of CKD, the heterogeneity of progression patterns among the risk population, and the interactions with other clinical conditions. Genetics also plays an important role. In previous work, we and others have demonstrated that African Americans with high-risk APOL1 genotypes are more likely to develop CKD, tend to develop CKD earlier, and the disease progresses faster. Diabetes, which is more common in African Americans, also significantly increases risk for CKD. Data and Method: Electronic medical records (EMRs)…

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*** This news item is 3rd party content and is included strictly for non-commercial informational purposes.

Blood bank seeking more African-American donors to help with unique disease




ATLANTA – This summer, there is a critical need for one type of emergency supply: blood.

Local blood bank officials told Channel 2 Action News they need more African-American donors to help with a unique disease.

Tiereny Bell manages several things at once, including her…

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*** This news item is 3rd party content and is included strictly for non-commercial informational purposes.

Living In Pain: North Texas Boy’s Fight With Sickle Cell Disease


Living with constant pain is a reality for people with sickle cell disease, an inherited disease of hemoglobin, a molecule that carries oxygen within red blood cells. 

Patients with sickle cell disease have red blood cells containing abnormal hemoglobin, which causes the cells to become stiff and form a sickle or crescent shape.

Because it is difficult for sickle shaped cells to pass through small blood vessels, the flow of blood is sometimes blocked, and oxygen does not reach nearby tissues. 

A bone marrow transplant is the only known cure for sickle cell disease, but finding a well-matched donor hasn’t been easy for 8 -year-old Darian Smith of Garland.

He was diagnosed at ten days old and doesn’t know when he will experience his next episode of pain, called a sickle cell crisis.

“When I feel it…

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*** This news item is 3rd party content and is included strictly for non-commercial informational purposes.

Black People Are More Likely Than Whites to Die of Heart Disease. Here’s One Reason Why. – Mother Jones


It’s not just diet and lifestyle that determine your risk for heart disease—race matters, too. About 37 percent of white men and 32 percent of white women develop heart disease, versus 44 percent of black men and 49 percent of black women. Overall, the average life expectancy for African Americans is 3.4 years shorter than for white Americans, and researchers attribute most of that disparity to the differences in heart disease rates.

The reasons black Americans have higher rates of cardiovascular problems are complicated—among them, as researchers have pointed to, elevated levels of stress as a result of poverty and racism. But a study published today in the journal JAMA Cardiology sheds…

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*** This news item is 3rd party content and is included strictly for non-commercial informational purposes.