Respect to General Sara Suten Seti

Respect to General Sara Suten Seti, the last man standing of the Web2.0 Black Consciousness era. For over 15 years, General Seti has been the #1 defender of Afraka’s greatness, withstanding personal, historical, and territorial attacks from religious idealists, Black ignoranimals, and white supremacists. This is an endorsement, not admiration because conscious minded people do not admire, or worship people, places, and things; we acknowledge and respect those who deserve respect.

Contrary to popular belief, Black Consciousness didn’t begin on social media, better known as the Web2.0 ara. Black Consciousness has been around for decades because it begins the moment a Black person wakes up and realizes that his or her troubles are not about tribalism, culture, or religion; it’s actually his race that is under attack. Unfortunately, we as a race haven’t been able to mount a unified defense as yet.

The reasons why we fail are many but the most common is our propensity to use the indoctrinations of our oppressors to fight our oppressors, not realizing that it only drives us further into mental slavery. For instance; many great religious Black leaders have risen up in the past but while they were successful in securing certain freedoms for Black people, the disrespect for the Black Race still remains. Most of us don’t realize that respect has to be earned but how can we hope to earn respect when other races have successfully destroyed our history and implanted theirs inside us?

Forget all the nonsense about American indigenousness, Black history began in Afraka. White Supremacists came close to destroying our history by omitting it from school curriculums and banning and burying books by Black scholars but thanks to people like Sara Suten Seti and a few others on social media, the minds of our youth are still being inspired to find the real truth of our Afrakan heritage.

Black respect comes in two forms, which are internal and external. Internal respect is achieved when a Black person becomes proud of his or her blackness. His or her desires will then be transformed into loving his or her physical appearance and desiring to maintain it.

External Black respect is achieved when other races respect our legacy and contribution to world history. This can only be achieved when we unearth our buried history and couple it with an effective Afrakan Spiritual belief system that we can depend on for strength and inspiration. Trying to claim the legacy of other races is not only foolish, it will never garner respect.

Some people might say that people like Sara Suten Seti are useless distractions to the reality we face as troubled race. That is because most of us who care about our state of existence are happy in our indoctrinations. We are either happy Christians, Muslims, or Agnostics and have no time for nontraditional forms of spiritual and social comforts because we believe that Time, the great equalizer, will work everything out.

However, the minds of Black youth are no longer in Churches and Mosques, they’re on social media being influenced by all sorts of mis-information and as most people can see, even the most powerful white supremacists have adopted social media as a tool for spreading confusion. Therefore, if our Black Race defenders are not on social media, they’re missing the boat in insuring that the next generation of Back youth won’t be drowned in the sea of anti-Blackness.

I’ve been watching Sara Suten Seti on social media for over ten years and while many other so-called Ghetto scholars have come and gone, he has been steadfast in his presentation and defense of Egyptology, which was not the only but is the most noticeable ancient Afrakan civilization. My divergence from what he and others teach and preach about Egyptology is the belief that we can regain Black respect by readopting ancient traditions and beliefs.

I don’t believe that returning to the traditions and practices of our Afrakan ancestors is the answer to our woes. We can admire Egyptian architecture and spiritual practices all day but the key is to understand the psychology behind it all. I believe that greater things will come when we begin to use the inspirations of Afraka’s greatness to create greater systems for today. As long as there are people like Sara Suten Seti around to keep the Afrakan narrative in the diaspora alive, it will inspire new Black minds towards that goal.

That is why I respect Sara Suren Seti.

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